Pointe Shoe Translation

How To Say Pointe Shoes In:

English—————————————–Pointe Shoes

Chinese……………………………………………….. 硬鞋   ( Hard shoes)

Czech.…………………………………………………. špičky

Estonian………………………………………………Varvaskingad

French—————————————–Pointes or Chausson de pointes

German—————————————-Spitzenschuhe

Italian-—————————————–Scarpe Da Punta

Japanese……………………………………………… トウシューズ  ( Toeshoesu)

Lithuanian….………………………………………..Puantai

Norwegian…………………………………………..Tåspiss sko

Spanish—————————————-Zapatillas De Punta

Portuguese————————————Sapatilhas De Ponta

Dutch-——————————————Spitzen

Russian—————————————–Puanty

Swedish—————————————–Tåskor

Greek-——————————————-Pouent

Afrikaans—————————————-Pointe-Skoene

Polish———————————————Pointe Buty

Note: 9/18/15  All of these translations have been updated to reflect reader comments & corrections below.  Feel free to tell us what you call your pointe shoes in your country.

20 responses to “Pointe Shoe Translation

  1. Thats really neat , thanks for your site I really enjoy it . Its easy to acccess all the diffrent brands websites wich can be hard with the less known brands. I am looking to go en pointe soon so i think its good to be prepared i have already staked out my fav. brands as far as appearance

  2. Actually the correct word in swedish for point shoes is “Tåskor” which litteraly means “toe shoes”.

    Regards
    Pia

  3. The correct word for pointe shoes in french is : pointes or chausson de pointes.

  4. Great info.Thank you. Only 10 more countries to go. Where’s Africa and Greece?

  5. in greek they are also called:
    “pouent”

    in french they are written “pointes” but pronounced like “pouant”

    both corrections are for sure !
    hope i helped!

  6. Dear editor, Nice list! A more common term for pointe shoes in the Netherlands is ‘spitzen’. May be you could add that to the Dutch translation? Kind regards, Madelon

  7. In brazilian portuguese it´s ok, sapatilhas de ponta. Great website!

  8. This is fabulous! So happy to have found your blog. I’ve become obsessed with pointe shoes. So many different styles and now I’ve found a pair on eBay in Germany which look to have an amazingly tapered platform which I’d love to buy but they don’t offer Paypal so I’ll just have to look at the picture. The brand is Martin but they look much narrower than any of the current offerings on the Martin website.
    Off to search your blog! Perhaps I’ll find more about these sleek Martins!

  9. pointe shoes are špičky in Czech🙂

  10. The French translation is wrong. It is simply “pointe” as in English. Chaussons are flats so chausson de danse would referents soft ballet shoes, certainly not points!

  11. Norwegian/Norway: Tåspiss sko

  12. The Dutch is definitely not “Pointe Schoenen” (a literal translation). We call them spitzen (plural) or spitz (singular). The pronounciation and the origin of the word is German. It means tip/top/extremity. Similar is the German “Fingerspitzen” fingertops or a mountaintop can also be called a Spitz in German.

  13. In Estonian: varvaskingad. Varvas is toe and kingad is shoes. So word to word translation would be toe shoes.

  14. Besides “pointes,” the French term can also be “les chaussons de pointe.”

    Chinese: 足尖鞋 or 硬鞋

  15. In japanese ballet slippers are called バレエシューズ (direct translation of the characters: bareeshuuzu) –> it almost sounds like balletshoes but is spoken softer like balleshoesu and the u at the end isn’t really audible.
    Pointe shoes are called トウシューズ (direct translation of the characters: toushuuzu) –> it sounds like toeshoes but is spoken like toshoesu.
    Hope this is interesting for you.

  16. 足尖 zú jiān
    鞋 xíe
    硬鞋 yìng xíe

    I’m from Singapore and Chinese (mandarin) is my second language and mother tongue. I don’t think we actually call pointe shoes that. In my classes we use English so I’m not too sure. But 鞋 means shoe and 硬鞋 just means hard shoe 😕

  17. T, I am Chinese and a professional writer, and I can assure you that pointe shoes are known as” 硬鞋” (hard shoes) or “足尖鞋“ (tip-of-the-feet shoes) in the Chinese-speaking world–at least in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Mainland China. Perhaps in Singapore and Malaysia the term is different.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s